Thursday, June 23, 2016

Manitou Cliff Dwellings

The Manitou Cliff Dwellings are located just outside of Manitou Springs, Colorado and are an example of cliff dwellings built by the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. These cliff dwellings are not original to the site - they were originally built in the Southwestern corner of Colorado - close to Mesa Verde National Park's cliff dwellings. They were collected, packaged and moved by railroad from 1904 to 1907 to the Colorado Springs area and rebuilt using concrete and mortar - which is why you can tour, walk on and climb these ruins with no chance of damaging them. The move was to protect the ruins from looters and relic collectors before the federal government passed The Antiquities Act of 1906.










A Native American family lived in these ruins, as late as 1984. You can visit the ruins - and see the rooms where the families lived. The cliff dwellings protected the Taos people from invaders. They could pull up the ladders and essentially be safe from attackers - they couldn't be reached from above or below. You can see the hooks where they hung vegetables and meat - and see how low lying the ceilings are. This tribe was short!






















When you visit the Manitou Springs Cliff Dwellings you can also visit the small museum and gift shop. The cost to visit is minimal - I think it was $7 - and it's a quick stop on your way to Pikes Peak. Our visit took maybe an hour, tops. I've not been to Mesa Verde and it's cliff dwellings so it was fun to visit and learn the history of these fascinating people.









This post is part of a link-up with: Travel Photo Thursday at Budget Travelers Sandbox , Weekend Wanderlust at A Brit and A Southerner and Weekend Travel Inspiration at Reflections Enroute!








16 comments:

  1. Wow! Now, that is an interesting story. It is difficult to visualize the entire movement process but I have seen it in other places in the world (like Abu Simbel in Egypt).

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    1. I know - I was so amazed when they said it had been moved - crazy, huh? Thanks for visiting Ruth!

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  2. I am always amazed how building can just be "packed up" and moved. Ruth mentioned Abu Simbel, which I have visited, and again what an undertaking to move. I would love to visit these cliff dwellings and roam around for a few hours. Thanks for linking up this week! #TPThursday

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    1. It is pretty amazing, isn't it? Thanks for visiting and for the link-up!

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  3. The Poles that come out of the walls to the exterior look like ones I've seen in Morocco. I can't imagine the buildings being shifted.

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    1. I actually thought the cliff dwellings were natural to the area until I arrived and found out differently. So what became a historical visit became one of engineering also. Fascinating. Thanks for visiting, Jan!

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  4. Being able to walk within the ruins must have been a fantastic experience. I can't imagine all of the buildings being moved, must have been a tremendous amount of work.

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    1. It was - and I really didn't know anything about it before I went there - my youngest daughter picked it out to visit. Just one of those spontaneous things. Thanks for visiting!

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  5. That's amazing that they moved the entire site. Gorgeous photos.

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    1. Thanks Corinne! And thanks for visiting!

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  6. If you like cliff dwellings and you haven't been to Mesa Verde then you really need to plan a trip. They will just blow you away. We have been to both Manitou and Mesa Verde and while Manitou are interesting they don't have anything like the impressive location which Mesa Verde has. I didn't know they had been moved.

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    1. We are headed to Mesa Verde next month and I can't wait to see it. Thanks for visiting, Lyn!

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  7. I can't imagine that the native American family lived there till 1984! That must be freezing in the winter! www.travelbug.co

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    1. I agree - we were there in winter but we were dressed in layers with winter coats so it didn't seem cold but I bet it gets pretty cold. Thanks for stopping by!

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  8. I've been to Mesa Verde and became fascinated with this pice of history.

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    1. Can't wait to go - thanks for visiting!

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